Colorado Supreme Court Rules Police Need Probable Cause Before Using Drug-Sniffing Dogs

In many ways, the legalization of marijuana is an ongoing project, even in states where possession has already been made legal. That’s because after weed is legal, there are all sorts of other legal questions and implications that arise.

The legality and role of drug-sniffing dogs is one example. Prior to legalization, K-9 units were typically trained to detect a broad range of illegal substances. And that included cannabis.

But when weed becomes legal in a state, the legal system must suddenly figure out what to do about these dogs. Specifically, state legal systems must determine if it’s still legal to have dogs alert cops to the presence of legal amounts of marijuana.

These are questions being asked in Colorado. And now, the Colorado Supreme Court has made its decision. In a new ruling, the state’s courts have decided that drug-sniffing dogs can no longer be used by cops if they don’t have probable cause for a search.

Colorado Supreme Court’s New Decision

The new decision states that cops can’t use pot-sniffing dogs before they have first established probable cause that a crime has been committed.

This is a big break from the past. Prior to this decision, drug-sniffing dogs

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