Missouri Marijuana News

‘We’re kind of doing it the old-fashioned Maritime way, which is storytelling’.

Myrna Gillis sports a colourful rainbow bracelet as a way to demonstrate that her company is dedicated to inclusiveness. In small letters, the word “reef” is printed.

“We also have given this to all of our staff as part of Pride celebrations to promote diversity within our workplace,” Gillis said from her company’s office in Bedford, N.S.

She is the CEO of Aqualitas, a cannabis producer with a production plant in Liverpool, N.S. The company has a licence to cultivate and she hopes the business will be authorized to sell by the time legalization rolls around this fall.

– Read the entire article at CBC News.

Read More Here…

‘I look at all the medications I’ve taken over the years, and they don’t help like medical marijuana’.

An Ottawa woman living with multiple sclerosis says the province’s refusal to cover the cost of medical marijuana is driving her to risk addiction to opiate painkillers.

Bobbi Assoun, 47, has a doctor’s prescription and is federally licensed to use marijuana for MS-related pain. As a recipient of benefits through the Ontario Disability Support Program, her drug costs would normally be covered by the Ontario Drug Benefit program, but that program doesn’t include medical cannabis.

“There’s only one thing that it will mean, which is that I’ll be going back and using my Dilaudid,” said Assoun, referring to the opioid also known as hydromorphone.

– Read the entire article at CBC News.

Read More Here…

In an effort to better understand the ways cannabis use impacts traffic safety, UC San Diego is conducting a virtual driving study that tests how driving high impacts the ability to respond to common challenges on the roadway. The study, the largest of its kind to date, is being conducted by the college’s Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research. And to make sure they’re attracting the right candidates, researchers are paying people to smoke weed for the study.

For Participants, It Pays To Drive High

If the idea of getting paid to smoke weed and get behind the wheel sounds good to you, you’re in luck. UC San Diego’s Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research is still recruiting participants for its study on cannabis and driving.

And for the study’s participants, it pays to drive high. The CMCR is giving participants $50 for an initial appointment. But when participants come back for their full day assessment, UCSD is prepared to drop an additional $180.

Those involved in the study will have their work cut out for them. Besides a long day of simulated driving, there’s no guarantee a participant will even get high.

Anyone participating in the study, however, will get to

Read More Here…

“We thought it was less than that,” says principal investigator Richard Belanger.

About half of pediatric doctors surveyed about cannabis say they’ve encountered a young patient who had used marijuana for a medical reason.

The questionnaire for the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program found 419 of 835 respondents had a patient who had used either authorized or unauthorized cannabis for some sort of medical relief.

The one-time study did not detail how many cases involved unauthorized use, the nature of the condition being treated nor the ages of the patients. But principal investigator Richard Belanger says he’s surprised by the number of young cannabis users and says it points to the need for more information for doctors, parents and patients.

– Read the entire article at Huffington Post.

Read More Here…

Republican Party groups in Oklahoma have joined the fight against restrictions added by regulators to the state’s new medical marijuana program. On June 26, voters passed State Question 788 (SQ 788) by a margin of 57-43 percent. The measure legalizes the medicinal use of cannabis in the state and creates a regulated supply chain to provide medicine to patients.

But then last week, the Oklahoma State Board of Health (OSBH) slapped controversial restrictions on proposed rules to govern the program. One bans the sale of smokable forms of marijuana in dispensaries, while another requires that cannabis providers have a licensed pharmacist on site.

The Fight Begins

Almost immediately, activists and some individual lawmakers vowed to fight the board’s restrictions. So far, at least two lawsuits have been filed to challenge the rules in court.

“We will absolutely throw the book at them with class-action lawsuits on behalf of patients. We won’t be railroaded,” said Chip Paul of the advocacy group Oklahomans for Health.

“We simply want our state question implemented and properly regulated,” he added.

A press release from Oklahomans for Health called on legislators to join the fight to “reinstate the will of the people and do whatever is needed

Read More Here…

Good news! Today, the New Jersey Department of Health announced that it will begin accepting applications for six additional businesses that can grow, process, and sell medical cannabis in the state. The winning businesses are supposed to be announced on November 1. Unfortunately, there is no provision yet for equity applicants, although applicants may be awarded up to 50 (out of 1,000) points for diversity.

With the tiny number of existing businesses, patients have experienced supply shortages and high prices due to a lack of competition. Today’s expansion should help begin to address these problems, although more will need to be done. Separating the licenses for growing, processing, and selling cannabis will help make many more types of products available to patients, and the health department plans to consider additional applications for these licenses beginning in the fall.

In other news, while the June 30 budget deadline came and went without legislative action on any of the pending marijuana bills, Senate President Steve Sweeny has said he believes there could be a vote on legalizing and regulating this summer.

If you are a New Jersey resident, click here to ask for your lawmakers’ support.

Related

Read More Here…

The treatment was unconventional. People addicted to everything from alcohol to opioids were given the option of using marijuana to help deal with withdrawal symptoms from their former drugs of choice. But nearly a year after the facility, a Los Angeles-based rehab center known as High Sobriety, opened its doors, a consultant to the operation started to notice problems.

“It was like walking into a cloud of smoke,” Sherry Yafai, the facility’s new clinical director, told Business Insider. That’s no longer the case, according to Yafai, who took on a leadership role at the facility roughly a year after it opened and made some major changes to its treatment protocol.

Her changes hint at a tough reality about the use of cannabis as medicine. Although marijuana is being increasingly recognized for its potential health benefits, using (and dispensing) it remains an inexact science that can be further complicated by stigma and misunderstandings about drug use.

– Read the entire article at Business Insider.

Read More Here…

The recommendation comes in a big report to Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

The New York Department of Health last week backed legalizing marijuana for recreational use in a report to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, who in the past opposed the policy change but now appears to be moving closer to supporting it.

The 75-page report ultimately concluded that the pros outweigh the cons for legalization. “Numerous [New York state] agencies and subject matter experts in the fields of public health, mental health, substance use, public safety, transportation, and economics worked in developing this assessment,” the report said. “No insurmountable obstacles to regulation of marijuana were raised.”

– Read the entire article at Vox.

Read More Here…

No matter what state your marijuana dispensary operates in, there are certain regulations that apply to remain cannabis compliant. Meeting these requirements is essential when seeking approval for a dispensary business license. However, cannabis retailers often struggle to consistently meet compliance standards while running a storefront day to day. Fortunately, taking control of cannabis compliance is easy when your retailer is equipped with powerful dispensary software. 

Age Validation

As soon as a customer walks into your storefront, there are compliance protocols that must be followed and validating age is the very first. Most states with medical marijuana allow consumers 18+ to purchase cannabis and recreational use is a mandatory 21+ across the board. Installing IndicaOnline’s intelligent dispensary software will allow you receptionist to validate a customers age with one swipe. 

A hidden advantage of swiping a patrons drivers license is that there ID information will be automatically fill certain fields on their customer profile. This will ensure that your dispensary doesn’t serve underage clientele, while expediting check-in for those customers who are eligible to make purchases. Selling to minors is a very serious compliance violation, and there have already been several license suspensions in California, Colorado, and Oregon for this specific

Read More Here…

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is gearing up to roll out new regulations for the state’s licensed cannabis growers. The regulations aim to give the state more control and oversight over cannabis harvests. But growers are already pushing back. They say the new rules could interfere with the delicate and often unpredictable timing of harvesting plants at their peak.

New Harvest Regulations Aim To Better Monitor Crop Surpluses

One of the major reasons states legalize adult-use cannabis is to push out illicit operators. The idea is to have a monitored, regulated market that makes it too risky and difficult for black market producers to survive. It’s either get above board or perish.

The reality on the ground, however, isn’t so clean cut. While on the decline, the illicit cannabis market still exists alongside the legal, regulated one. Especially as states make the transition to legal marijuana.

And that’s exactly Oregon’s concern. The state worries that legal cultivators are diverting their surplus crops to the black market.

In response to those concerns, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission is working on a new set of rules to give regulators a better sense of how much cannabis growers are producing—and where it’s all

Read More Here…